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If You Know Your Boss is 100% Wrong About Something How Would You Handle It?

If you know your boss is 100% wrong about something how would you handle it? Although most people detest this question, I believe it should be asked. It reveals a lot about your character, so it could be advisable to respond as personally as you feel, especially if the interviewer will eventually become your boss. How can you really say how you would handle someone you don't know yet? If you can relate this question to your current or previous boss, that gives the interviewer the impression that you are not only a good judge of character but also that you understand people are different and this situation may need to be approached in a different way with a different boss.


If You Know Your Boss is 100% Wrong About Something How Would You Handle It?

  

If You Know Your Boss is 100% Wrong About Something How Would YouHandle It?


Answer #1

“Since my management is only human and may not be aware of a mistake they have made, if I were certain that my manager was mistaken about something, I would talk to them about it and share my opinions. I would explain why I believed they were mistaken as well as what I believed to be incorrect. I would advise speaking with other coworkers about the situation if we came to a standstill. My current boss is excellent at listening when I feel he is mistaken about something, and if there is a disagreement, we always settle it by polling the team and the decision is made by the majority. The outcomes reveal who was correct.”

Answer #2

“My present boss is quite rigid and insists on being right all the time. I will try to tell him if he asks me to do anything that his method of doing it will not work, but he will usually insist that I do it that way. I, therefore, follow his instructions, and he typically recognises when something goes wrong that it was caused by his instruction. He discovers that the method I was supposed to use does not work, and I am not willing to accuse him of insubordination.”

Answer #3

“Being the "Boss" for my entire life, I can understand how the boss could make a mistake now and then. At the previous bar where I worked, I managed, and I constantly changed the lines in a particular way. When a new supervisor I recruited arrived, I noticed he wasn't at ease with anything and I asked what it was. He stated that I was doing it incorrectly and that there was a much better way that he had been taught. HE explained his approach, and I had to admit it was superior. In a comparable circumstance, I'd like to think I could go to my manager and suggest "Try this." There is nothing to lose at the end of the day.”

Good luck.


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